Hacker or No Hacker?

Greetings Penguins!

Don’t worry about the critical review for the School & Skate Party – that’s coming soon! For now though, the focus will be on the recent rise in hacking that’s plagued the game with Beta Hats and Red Leis. Hacking is no alien to CP; it has been around even since the beginning (though on a much lesser scale).

In the old days (2007 in particular), there were numerous CP Trainers (which are third-party software developed to edit the game in certain ways, they are against CP’s rules) that would allow you to become Rockhopper, have Member-only Puffles as a non-member and add as much coins to your account as possible. However, all these trainers were soon fixed by the CP Team. Some promised the ability to add free membership, others tried to convince that they possessed the ability to add rare items like the Beta Hat. There were other perks too, like the ability to walk on walls so they appeared to be Ninjas (which were heavily rumoured on the island up until their official release in November 2008). Any penguins spotted hacking were (almost) instantly banned.

Throughout this year, hacking has seen arguably its’ biggest rise ever. Yes there were many, many trainers back during CP’s youth, but the programs of today seem to contain a bigger threat. Why? Well, most of these hacking programs seen currently are Item Adders. As the name suggests, these programs can add items to your account. Some can add just the non-patched items (Code Items in particular are very popular) whereas some can add absolutely any item in the game. All you need to do is enter your account information (which is never recommended) and the ID of the item you want. Simple.

This means that a ridiculous amount of penguins can be seen wearing Beta Hats and other rare items, even in hugely populated servers like Blizzard. How can people get away with blatantly flaunting that they are a hacker on the busiest server in the game? Shouldn’t there be moderators keeping an eye on this server in particular? Regardless of this, very few penguins have been banned due to hacking. Admittedly, rarity is not what it used to be. A legit Beta can barely get a crowd of 3 penguins never mind the potential to create huge crowds rivalling today’s mascots.

How to spot a Hacker 

So, you go onto a server. Whether it be the energetic Blizzard or the calm rare-show-off-fest known as Sleet, chances are you will see a rare Beta Hat (or not) wearing penguin at some point. But, is it the real deal or a rule-breaker? In some cases, it’s impossible to tell. However, there are a few simple ways to check that are usually very effective for catching out the amateur hackers.

1) Pins

With the introduction of the Stamp Book, seeing if a penguin is genuine or not never became easier. Simply go on the penguin in question’s Stamp Book and check their pins. Do they have a lot of pins? Are they all from 2006+ or is their first pin one that was released last week? In many cases, their first pin will be Rockhopper’s Key. Originally released in 2008 but still available today, it is often the first pin in many penguin’s collections. If their first pin is Rockhopper’s Key, you can bet your Puffle that you have discovered a hacker.

Unfortunately, this step has a significant flaw. Since penguins can add any item using particular programs nowadays, they can also hack pins. This means that, more than likely, if a penguin is willing to hack a Beta Hat he/she is just as likely to hack the first few pins such as the Shamrock, Music Note and Pizza Slice. Beware of this, as it is very misleading. However, if said penguin has the first few pins then their collection misses a bunch of pins and skips to Rockhopper’s Key (or a more recent pin), it is also likely he/she is a hacker.

2) Stamps

Again with the Stamp Book, it has become one of the most defining elements for discovering hackers. This method catches out most amateur hackers and is one that few think of, but in fact is extremely simple and logical. As you may know, there are certain stamps to look out for. These are both located under the Activities section and will fully determine if a penguin really is as old as they say they are. The stamps to look out for are called ‘183 Days!’ and ‘365 Days! respectively. Both are obtained when you log in with a penguin of that age or older.

Since Beta Testing was way back in 2005, the age of a penguin with a Beta Hat would dramatically exceed these numbers and thus, they will easily have both of these stamps. If they don’t have these stamps but instead have a Beta Hat or other rare item that is unavailable by any other means, you can bet 1 million coins you’ve found a hacker. Congratulations!

3) Penguin ID 

Did you know that your penguin has a penguin ID? This is the ID given to each and every penguin to ever sign up to the game. This ID is representative of when you signed up. For example, if you were the 1000th person to sign up to Club Penguin, your Penguin’s ID will be 1000. Simple stuff, right? Well, since Beta Testers were amongst the first few to play the game, their penguin’s ID must be under 15,000 to be legitimate Beta Tester. If they have a ridiculously large ID such as one that exceeds one million, well, it’s obvious what they are.

The only issue with this method is that you cannot check a penguin’s ID in-game (unless they have the name P, followed by a bunch of numbers – which is their ID, e.g P1000000). Whilst it is true that some programs show a penguin’s ID, please remember programs are against the CP rules. Though I guess if it’s for catching out hackers – it’s more like a good deed. You can always try contacting CP with the suspected penguin’s Username and perhaps they could check. If you’ve been given this penguin by a friend, it makes checking that much easier. However, the method listed below is the ultimate way of checking – though the most difficult to do.

4) Checking a Penguin’s Age

This is the final method of checking if someone is legit or not. However, it is impossible to do without actually having the penguin’s account information. With this in mind, it’s only effective for those who have been given a penguin or have somehow acquired the username and password. As this step possesses such a huge flaw, I wouldn’t recommend it. It’s probably not even worth your time to go this far into the case in all honesty.

So, You’ve discovered a Hacker!

It’s very likely at some point, using one or several of these steps that you will discover a hacked penguin. But what exactly do you do at this stage? You can always report said player and cross your flippers that they will get banned (though this seems unlikely due to how relaxed CP seems to be with all the hacking going on lately). If hackers disgust you in ways you cannot possibly describe in words, simply ignore them for a hacker-free experience. Or, if you feel like been extra evil, you can always crush their dreams by announcing that they are a hacker in front of everyone. That will surely catch ’em out!

Next Time: School & Skate Party Critical Review!

Random CP Fact #26: Next month’s annual Halloween Party will be the 10th to occur on the island. The very first began on October 27th 2005. 

Until next time, Waddle on!

– Jimbobson

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About Jimbobson

Virtual World & Tech enthusiast. 3D Artist.

Posted on October 1, 2014, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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